Speaker

Dr. Magnus Nord
Electron microscopy for Materials science, University of Antwerp, Belgium

Title

Introduction to Jupyter Lab

Abstract

JupyterLab is an interactive development environment for working with notebooks, code and data. Additionally, JupyterLab enables you to use text editors, terminals, data file viewers, and other custom components side by side with notebooks in a tabbed work area. It is a powerful tool for scientists to perform their data analysis, that is easily shareable with collaborators or students.

In this workshop we will help set up the python environment for running jupyter lab and installing extensions. Once everyone has their notebook up and running, we'll expain some of the basic elements of writing your own notebooks and perform some simple exercises for visualizing data using matplotlib . Finally, we'll also help introduce some interactive elements using the ipywidgets extension.

Registration is free, just send an email to PhysicsColloquia@uantwerpen.be in order to attend. There will be a short coffee break as well as some drinks afterwards to provide an opportunity for discussion and getting to know your colleagues at the department.


Friday, March 22, 2019

Campus Groenenborger G.Z.421

14:00 - 17:00 Workshop

17:00 - 18:00 Reception

Speaker

Marnik Bercx
Electron microscopy for Materials science, University of Antwerp, Belgium

Title

Fireworks

Abstract

"Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe."
- Abraham Lincoln
" Fireworks is a free, open-source code for defining, managing, and executing workflows. Complex workflows can be defined using Python, JSON, or YAML, are stored using MongoDB, and can be monitored through a built-in web interface. Workflow execution can be automated over arbitrary computing resources, including those that have a queueing system."

In this workshop we will demonstrate some of the basic functionality of fireworks, and help set up the mongoDB server used for storing the workflows. Next, we'll set up some simple workflows in Python so users have the basic skills necessary to start designing their own.

Registration is free, just send an email to PhysicsColloquia@uantwerpen.be in order to attend. There will be a short coffee break as well as some drinks afterwards to provide an opportunity for discussion and getting to know your colleagues at the department.


Friday, May 19, 2019

Campus Groenenborger - TBA

14:00 - 17:00 Workshop

17:00 - 18:00 Reception

Speaker

Prof. Dr. Marc De Graef
Carnegie Mellon University

Title

Music by the Numbers: Why do certain musical chords sound better than others?

Abstract

Music is, fundamentally, a progression in time of single or multiple frequencies, commonly known as "tones". As we listen to music, some combinations of tones may evoke certain emotions; happy or sad feelings, for instance, are often associated with major and minor chords, respectively. It turns out that those emotional responses tend to be independent of age and culture; therefore, the cause must lie in the underlying physics of sound and how we perceive sound. In this presentation, we will begin by defining the basic notions of sounds (frequency, harmonics or overtones, amplitude, timbre, ...), and we will use the fact that the human ear has a logarithmic response to frequencies to explain why there are 12 intervals in an octave (i.e., 5 black + 7 white keys on a keyboard) in Western music. Then we "derive" a model for the various musical scales and introduce the concepts of tension, harmony, consonance, and sonority. We will present simple mathematical models for all these musical concepts. No extensive prior knowledge of music is required to attend this talk; all concepts will be introduced as needed. Throughout the presentation, we will illustrate several concepts with a few finger-picking guitar pieces.


Thursday, June 13, 2019

Campus Groenenborger - TBA

16:00 - 17:15

17:15 - 18:00